Home Miso Teriyaki Pork Ribs, with Soy Butter

Miso Teriyaki Pork Ribs, with Soy Butter

by Brad Prose

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miso teriyaki pork ribs

Grab these Juicy Pork Ribs

These teriyaki pork ribs are delicious. Oh, you wanted me to be more specific? These sweet, spicy, and savory teriyaki pork ribs are slow-smoked to perfection and glazed with soy butter jus. You can’t forget the power move, that sauce levels them up!

Keeping it Simple and Savory

My favorite spice in the lineup of the Spiceology Sriracha blends is this one: Miso Teriyaki. The first finger dip amazed me, tasting all of the individual flavors of soy, miso, sugars, and of course the cayenne. Looking into my BBQ-brain, the first protein screaming out at me was pork. Smoked pork shoulder will probably be amazing, but I wanted to start with my favorite finger food of them all: Pork ribs.

The ingredient lineup impresses me, with a combination of Sriracha salt, gochugaru (Korean red chile flakes) and red miso powder. Three incredible, very unique flavor profiles come together to balance out the sugar and soy. It’s amazing where spice companies are able to do, replicating our favorite liquid sauces into fresh powders.

Seasoning the baby back ribs before going on the smoker
Seasoning the baby back ribs before going on the smoker.

Prepping & Smoking Process

You can see I’ve chosen to use baby back ribs for this cook. Fat content is incredibly different between baby back ribs and spare ribs, so they will cook differently as well. Famously, the 3-2-1 smoking process for ribs is used for spare ribs or St. Louis ribs, however, I’ve found that they produce overcooked baby back ribs.

Prepping for the Smoker

  1. Remove the membrane. This is recommended, but not mandatory. It’s the thin skin on the back of the ribs, the side with the bones. You can simply take a paper towel and rip off the membrane pretty easily.
  2. Season the ribs. Seasoning ahead of time will give you the best bark, even if it’s only a few hours before they start cooking. Short on time? That’s OK, you can still season right before. Give them at least 30 minutes to allow for the seasoning to settle in.

Smoking the Baby Back Ribs

The process for smoking baby back ribs is shorter, a total of around 4 hours instead of the typical 6 hours.

  1. Preheat your smoker for 250°F. This recipe works well using an offset smoker or a pellet smoker, whichever you prefer.
  2. Smoke for 2 1/2 hours. Spritz them every 45 minutes or so with apple cider vinegar, specifically around the edges to prevent them from drying out.
  3. Wrap and season the ribs. This is the time to add some sugar, butter, and the magic ingredient of soy. Trust me.
  4. Throw them back on for 1 hour. Not 2, just 1. We are making ribs that are not fall-off-the-bone.
  5. Unwrap, glaze, and return to smoker for 15 minutes. KEEP THE LIQUID when you unwrap carefully, that’s the gold! We’re just finishing the ribs at this point.

The Power Move

We’ve seasoned, smoked, and seasoned the teriyaki pork ribs some more. Through this process you’ll have this wonderful sauce from the pork fat, sugar, soy and butter. Make sure you save that magic sauce and dress the ribs at the very end for a power move, which completely elevates every bite.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I substitute soy?

You can, but realize there’s soy in the Miso Teriyaki Sriracha Blend. The small amount you’re adding when you wrap adds a nice umami, melted with the butter. Feel free to use typical soy substitutes such as liquid aminos.

Are these really sweet/spicy?

The main flavor profile is savory, followed by sweet and then heat. It’s very similar to a pork stir-fry where you have layers of flavors in the sauce.

How do I cook them if I’m using spare ribs?

Use the 3-2-1 method of smoking, wrapping, and finishing. You’ll have to use your own judgement to see if they are too tender, or not tender enough. I encourage you to check during that last hour, earlier than you think. Trust me.

Feeling adventurous? Try out my Kimchi Pork Ribs using dehydrated kimchi for the seasoning (homemade)

teriyaki pork ribs with sauce
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miso teriyaki babyback ribs

Miso Teriyaki Pork Ribs, with Soy Butter

  • Author: Brad Prose
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 5
  • Total Time: 5 hours 30 minutes
  • Yield: 68 1x
  • Category: Pork
  • Method: Smoking
  • Cuisine: Pork Ribs

Description

These sweet, spicy, and savory teriyaki pork ribs are slow-smoked to perfection and glazed with soy butter jus.


Ingredients

Scale

Instructions

  1. Remove the membrane. Take a paper towel and rip off the membrane pretty easily.
  2. Season the ribs on both sides. Try to do this at least 30-60 minutes ahead of putting them on the smoker.
  3. Preheat your smoker for 250°F.
  4. Smoke for 2 1/2 hours. Spritz them every 45 minutes or so with apple cider vinegar, specifically around the edges to prevent them from drying out.
  5. Prepare a sheet of heavy-duty foil on a counter.
  6. Slice each stick of butter into 8 tablespoons (2 sticks = 1 cup butter)
  7. Place 4 tbsp of butter and 2 tbsp of brown sugar on each piece of foil in a line, where you will set the ribs on top of.
  8. Remove the ribs from the smoker, placing 1 rack on each sheet of foil with the butter and brown sugar, meat-side down.
  9. Add another tbsp of butter and 2 tbsp of brown sugar, along with 2 tbsp soy.
  10. Fold up the foil and seal tightly.
  11. Throw them back on the smoker for 1 hour. 
  12. Unwrap, add more seasoning if needed on the top, and return to smoker for 15 minutes (bone-side down). Carefully keep the liquid when you unwrap.
  13. Remove from the smoker and allow them to rest for about 15 minutes.
  14. Flip the ribs (bones up) and slice between the bones. Spoon over the liquid kept from the braising phase.

Notes

This method is meant for baby back ribs. If you’re using spare ribs, consider trying the 3-2-1 cooking method instead. Make sure you save the liquid after the foil phase, this is the best part. 

Keywords: pork ribs, baby back ribs, smoking, pork, miso, teriyaki, sriracha, spicy, spiceology

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